Advocacy Anytime Everywhere

book

Chapter 3 in Social Change Anytime Everywhere is really the heart of the book, I think, for many nonprofit practitioners. There are tons of great examples about organizations effectively using multichannel strategies (email, Facebook, text messaging) to engage and activate their constituencies around their causes.

And there are specific suggestions about how to make these tools work for you, which is why I can imagine some busy nonprofit communications/resource development/advocacy professionals skipping right to chapter 3 and making notes on a legal pad of things that they just have to try.

Among the ideas that were bookmarked in my copy:

  • Share progress on your interim goals–particularly when looking at long-term policy changes–with your online community.
  • Outline the specific actions you want people to take, but don’t oversimplify; if there’s no obvious alignment between the action and the seriousness of the problem, people won’t do anything, not because they don’t care or they’re too busy, but because you haven’t made the stakes explicit.
  • Choose your targets carefully–we are too quick, I think, in advocacy, to think that our targets have to be members of Congress, or state legislators, when there are valid reasons to identify non-governmental actors or, even, elected officials from other levels of government, as the targets. And you can use different approaches, different messages, and different appeals to different constituencies with these targets, which enlarges your potential sphere of activism.
  • Tailor your messages not just to your audience, but also to your channel. Yeah, we can’t just cut and paste our policy briefs into emails, but we shouldn’t have our Facebook feed into our Twitter, either. We can’t engage people through multiple channels if we are saying the same things across all platforms.
  • We are way, way, way underutilizing mobile technology; nonprofits in the developing world, by necessity, are considerably ahead of us on this, using missed calls, for example, as ‘petition signatures’ on campaigns, following up on advocacy alerts with brief texts, sharing data through QR codes, adding real value to our constituents with well-done mobile apps.

Question: What challenge, relating to online advocacy, is your organization grappling with right now? What questions do you think that you have to overcome, in order to move forward? What potential outcome excites you most, in thinking about the advocacy ‘pay off’ of multiple channel engagement? What question are you embarrassed to ask, that is keeping you up at night?

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2 responses to “Advocacy Anytime Everywhere

  1. Reblogged this on TMO Alief and commented:
    Using social media can have great benefits for not profits and advocacy groups.

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